Author Archives: alenaflick

panorama-for-auteur101.jpg

My panorama for the “Death of a Hired Man” performance.

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by | August 1, 2013 · 7:04 pm

Final Process Blog

Feeling pretty confident that I wouldn’t have to do anything too drastic to revise my first two shorts, I took it upon myself to make a third film. I really wanted to do something with clay, and, despite all the troubles I had obtaining said clay, I had a lot of fun making the actual animation. I would have liked to do something a little fancier, but, time constraints being what they were, I’m really pleased with how it turned out. It was fin to go through the whole process of claymation again, from storyboarding to working the clay to taking the photos. I was fortunate enough to get a positive response to my claymation in the workshop and not to have to do any revising for it.

For my first stop motion, the one with the paper, I mostly just had to enhance the contrast and play with the background color a little. I also ended up adding a brief moment of negative color at the end on the suggestion of the workshop. I had to look up how to get to the filters on Final Cut Pro three times, but, other than that, it went quickly and smoothly, and I think it came out looking really nice! I also had to swap out the audio, which meant I had to change the timing of my film very slightly, but it all worked out in the end. The revisions for “Under The Greenwood Tree” were also minor–we mostly just moved some shots around.

I am really pleased with my work throughout this class, and I feel like I might continue making short films in the future.

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Birds in Alarm–Final

Second version of short film based on the poem “Birds in Alarm” by John Clare, for a stop motion assignment. Directed by Alena Flick for the 2013 “Auteur 101″ class in Film & Media Studies at Johns Hopkins Summer Programs.

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by | July 25, 2013 · 5:33 pm

Come Slowly Eden–Final

Third version of short film based on the poem “Come slowly — Eden!” by Emily Dickinson, for a stop motion assignment. Directed by Alena Flick for the 2013 “Auteur 101″ class in Film & Media Studies at Johns Hopkins Summer Programs.

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by | July 25, 2013 · 5:15 pm

Under the Greenwood Tree (revision)

Second version of short film based on the poem “Under the Greenwood Tree” by William Shakespeare for a dynamic movement editing assignment. Directed by Alena Flick and Frank Lukaitis for the 2013 “Auteur 101″ class in Film & Media Studies at Johns Hopkins Summer Programs.

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by | July 24, 2013 · 4:31 pm

Come Slowly–Eden! (revision)

Second version of short film based on the poem “Come slowly — Eden!” by Emily Dickinson, for a stop motion assignment. Directed by Alena Flick for the 2013 “Auteur 101″ class in Film & Media Studies at Johns Hopkins Summer Programs.

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by | July 23, 2013 · 5:31 pm

Birds in Alarm

First version of short film based on the poem “Birds in Alarm” by John Clare, for a stop motion assignment. Directed by Alena Flick for the 2013 “Auteur 101″ class in Film & Media Studies at Johns Hopkins Summer Programs.

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by | July 23, 2013 · 5:29 pm

Come Slowly Eden Process

So this sure was an experience.

It turns out, there is no clay in Baltimore. At least, not anywhere a Johns Hopkins University Precollege student can get to without 3-4 people accompanying her. In a fit of frustration, I contacted my parents to complain. They were kind enough to offer to buy me clay and overnight the package to me. The package arrived at ten o’clock the next morning, according to an email… except it didn’t. It was probably in the building, but no one had given it to the precollege office, where I was supposed to pick it up, even at one that afternoon. I didn’t end up getting the package until late that night, when it was already too late. I’m hoping to do another video using the clay, but alas–overnight shipping was wasted.

Problem number two: Apparently, there are a finite number of Canon Rebel cameras available at the Digital Media Center. This was quite an upsetting revelation, as the rest of my class had already reserved the only available cameras for the weekend. I ended up having to use a camcorder that takes lower quality stills, which was annoying, but ultimately not as bad as it could have been.

When I finally decided what I was going to do (cut some shapes out of paper and arrange them in cool designs, essentially), the animating itself went pretty quickly. Choosing to use cloth as my background ended up being a huge pain, though, especially with the limited space available to me. I couldn’t really get the wrinkles out, though I did my best. All in all, the film actually got a much more positive response than I was expecting, so I’ve kind of come to terms with the difficulties I had to face in this process.

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Come Slowly — Eden!

First version of short film based on the poem “Come slowly — Eden!” by Emily Dickinson, for a dynamic movement/editing assignment. Directed by Alena Flick for the 2013 “Auteur 101” class in Film & Media Studies at Johns Hopkins Summer Programs.

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by | July 16, 2013 · 8:41 pm

Greenwood Tree Process

Frank and I had a very nature-oriented poem. Unfortunately, we couldn’t go to particularly far or exotic locations to shoot. We ended up finding a park a bit up the road from campus, and we shot all of our footage there. It was just a bunch of trees, grass, and some flowers, but we managed to make a film out of it by carefully choosing what to shoot and how to shoot it. We spent our morning jostling tree branches and chasing down birds, all while doing our best to time our footage to the recording we had to work with.

When we got to the editing stage, everything went pretty smoothly on the first day. We were actually kind of unnerved by how quickly we seemed to finish. After getting some notes from Dara, we decided to reconvene the next day.

Then the troubles started.

I would just like to say that I double-checked, before leaving, to make sure all the files were saved on my hard drive and able to open properly. This did not, however, prevent said files from magically becoming unusable the next day. Luckily, our .mov file still worked, so we imported that into Final Cut X, separated the audio from the video, reimported all the footage we had taken, and did some slicing and dicing to get everything where it needed to be. It turned out that we could have used a little extra footage for the musical intro, but we didn’t have any, so we wound up repeating shot from later. I think it turned out pretty well, though, and I’m satisfied with our work as a first draft.

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